Tire recommendation!

For those who have run the Slush series as well as summer events, I'm looking for a tire recommendation.

I'm looking for a good Autocross tire that will work in our winter Pacific North West conditions. Not worried about street driving, just autocross that can handle both dry and the cold rain conditions we have.

Car is a Honda Civic, tires preferably right now would size at 195-55-15.

First tire I was considering was the Toyo R1R or the BFG G-Force Sport Comp 2, thoughts? Price will be a factor here for sure.

Comments

  • edited November -1
    I would recommend two sets of tires and wheels for your situation.

    1) re71R for dry autocross days only. Don't drive these on the street. Its a waste if you do. You'll never reach their potential on the street and if you do, you're overdriving the car on the street.
    2) daily set would be the Conti ECS. This daily set would has a high thread count of 340 I believe and it allows to double as your rain tire. It does such a good job in the rain.
  • edited November -1
    The car these are going on will no longer be a daily driver, and will probably only see street time "for funzies".

    I'm going to stick with one tire year round for autocross. I realize it isn't ideal, but this is a budget car so budget will continue to play a role here. Family, house, other cars all eat into the budget quickly.

    I would look at the continental for the year round choice, but it dosen't look like its available (at least through tire rack) in a 195-55-15.

    Current choices are:

    Dunlop Direzza DZ102 (Have read the wet handling leaves alot to be desired, but looking for first hand reports)

    Kumho Ecsta PS31 (havent heard much good here, but thought I'd ask)

    BFG Sport Comp 2 (These seem to be the best all rounder with good price)

    Toyo Proxes R1R (Budget depending)

    The Toyo and the BFG are my front runners right now, Toyo depending on what I can get them for really. So any first hand experience with the above tires in our climate would be really helpful.
  • edited November -1
    The TL;DR answer is exactly as Marlon has said. Go with Bridgestone RE-71R for the dry, and go with Continental ExtremeContact Sport (ECS) for the wet or when the temps get below 2 - 5°C.

    The long-winded geeking out answer is, you'd want to look at a number of things in order to determine what tire you wanna run.

    1) Are you planning to run a dedicated set of autox tires? Or are you looking to simply use 1 set of wheels and tires for everything from DD to autox to other activities?
    2) What class are you planning to run in?
    3) How wide are the wheels that you plan on using for the new tires?
    4) How competitive do you want to be? And how important is staying on budget to you?

    To be competitive, the current gold standard for dry use (and generally not too cold) is Bridgestone RE-71R, and this tire is available in 205/50/15 and 195/50/15. Neither is the factory size you are looking for. But depending on your Civic's gearing, it would be advantageous to run one of the above sizes.

    For the wet (or cold), Conti ECS is the current gold standard. This tire is only available in 205/50/15.

    If you insist on staying with the factory size (195/55/15), the R1R would be the better option for dry use (and when it is not too cold). For Slush series, in particular, I've actually done quite well in the past on some brand new high performance all season tires, so you could potentially look in that direction as well. For what it is worth, I was running some Goodyear Eagle GT on a 2004 Civic. That tire has since been replaced by the Eagle Sport AS, and it seems to be quite a decent tire as well.
  • edited November -1
    As above

    1) Looking to have 1 tire all year round. Car is no longer a DD or normally street driven. Tires can be aggressive, but need to handle our Climate and run in both the dry and Slush series (when not snowing).

    2)Not sure on class yet. Its a Engine swapped 1996 Civic EX (swap from a 99 civic SiR) which i believe puts me into SM FWD, unless i somehow squeak in to a different class because of update and backdate allowances I have heard about.

    3)For now sticking to factory sizing so 6.5 wide. I may move up to a 7 inch, but on a 195 i should still be able to run that tire.

    4) Budget is more important than being competitive. This is more about me getting into the sport and being a better driver than being competitive right away. I believe I would switch cars to go to a different class when I want to be competitive.
  • edited November -1
    error06 wrote:

    BFG Sport Comp 2 (These seem to be the best all rounder with good price)
    Just so you know... I was able to buy these tires in 225/50/16 from Discount Tire Direct in the States for $73(US) apiece (with rebate factored in). It was a bit of a nuisance, but I brought them across the border two at a time... and wasn't required to pay any duty/taxes. I was pleased.

    Now that was back in May that I got that price... but they seem to quite often have great sale prices. Just gotta be patient. :)
    -Patrick
  • edited November -1
    Thanks for the tip FieroFan

    I usually have my tires shipped to Point Roberts, and I haven't been hit with duties and taxes yet, even when bringing across a full set of 4.

    Tire rack has them up for 83 US each right now, Ill see if that changes. Unfortunately might not be able to wait.
  • edited November -1
    error06 wrote:

    I usually have my tires shipped to Point Roberts, and I haven't been hit with duties and taxes yet, even when bringing across a full set of 4.
    I have my US purchases shipped to Blaine. $2 per package, and $5 per "bundle" of (one or two) tires.

    Several years ago when I was buying tires for the Fiero, I was required to pay duty/taxes when bringing a full set of four tires across the border. I now try to limit the total value of what I bring across to $200 per trip. So far, so good.
    -Patrick
  • 510510
    edited November -1
    Bridgestone RE-71R 205/50/15

    Costco has about the cheapest prices in North America. Often with a $70 off a set of 4 deal.
    Brian Hemming | 1990 Mazda Miata - CSP | 1993 Mazda MX6 - HS
  • edited November -1
    error06 wrote:
    1) Looking to have 1 tire all year round. Car is no longer a DD or normally street driven. Tires can be aggressive, but need to handle our Climate and run in both the dry and Slush series (when not snowing).

    2)Not sure on class yet. Its a Engine swapped 1996 Civic EX (swap from a 99 civic SiR) which i believe puts me into SM FWD, unless i somehow squeak in to a different class because of update and backdate allowances I have heard about.

    3)For now sticking to factory sizing so 6.5 wide. I may move up to a 7 inch, but on a 195 i should still be able to run that tire.

    4) Budget is more important than being competitive. This is more about me getting into the sport and being a better driver than being competitive right away. I believe I would switch cars to go to a different class when I want to be competitive.
    Given your requirements, I'd personally recommend running you picking up some Conti ECS from Tire Rack. Fantastic wet/cold performance with great dry performance. 205/50/15 is not ideal on a 6.5" wheel, but it'll work. If the fitment will work on your car, mounting those 205/50/15 tires on a 7.5" or 8" wheel would be even better. But even then the car won't be competitive in SMF.

    R1R would not work too well at the Slush Series temperatures. Between BFG Sport Comp 2 and Conti ECS, my vote goes to ECS, given the reviews, user reports, and ridealongs that I've read/sat through. A 205/50/15 tire will supposedly result in a slightly shorter (effective) gear ratio, but that shouldn't be a problem. In fact, it should be advantageous in an autox situation since you'll get more torque (at the cost of a slightly lower top speed).
  • edited November -1
    You should be looking at a 195/50 or 205/50-15. And there just isn't going to be "1 tire" that's going to be the best year round. I'd pick the better dry weather summer tire and get yourself a set of 15x7, 15x7.5 or 15x8 wheels. And then if your really don't want to spend the money buy some sort of crap tire just to have fun with in the slush events on your stock rims.
  • edited November -1
    ECS for the wet, Rival 1.5 or RE71 (pick your poison, I like both) for when it (inevitably, boo) dries out.

    That being said, I ran RE71's for every event my first year of slush and did alright.
    (Disclaimer: AWD is a hell of a drug)
    2008 Evo - DS
  • edited November -1
    single set of tires?
    Conti ECS.
    and dont expect to be competitive when its dry and warm. but it should be ok cold and dry (approaching freezing)

    or decide that you prioritize dry performance and get the re71r and then you will not be as competive in cold or wet event.
    Norman Hayton -
    2014 Mustang GT in F Street
    1999 BMW 323i for Rallycross
    2011 FSP Canadian National Champion
    2017 FS Canadian National Champion
  • edited November -1
    Going through the same question myself. Slush Series is a challenging series to buy tires for - the temperatures often make the "usual" choices non starters. I am not sure that it is even safe, much less enjoyable to be driving an RE71R at 0 degrees outside (particularly on the street on the way to the event).

    I am trying to decide between Conti DWS06 and Conti ECS as my "Slush" tire (with the benefit that I have a set of RE71Rs on another set of wheels). Leaning towards ECS given that I also don't need it for street driving.

    Hope that helps,
    Mark
    Mark Uhlmann, UBCSCC Ex-Pres
    BM #51: 2004 Stohr WF1
    STX #67: 2011 BMW 128i (sold 2019)
    DSP #67: 1997 BMW 328is (sold 2012)
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